Transportation

Alternative Fuels

Substitutes for Petroleum

Alternative fuels can be substituted for traditional gasoline or diesel fuels. The federal Energy Policy Act of 1992 identifies six such fuels listed below. Alternative fuels may be used either as a replacement for gasoline or in conjunction with it. All alternative fuels can be domestically produced, and most provide significant air quality benefits when used as a vehicle fuel.

Electric-Drive Vehicles

Electricity is considered an alternative fuel under the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and all-electric vehicles (EVs) store electricity in batteries to power one or more electric motors. The batteries are charged primarily by plugging in to off-board sources of electricity, produced from oil, coal, nuclear energy, hydropower, natural gas, wind energy, solar energy, and stored hydrogen.
 
Find a charging station near you.
 
 
Hybrid Electric Vehicles
HEVs are primarily powered by an internal combustion engine that runs on conventional or alternative fuel and an electric motor that uses energy stored in a battery. The battery is charged through regenerative braking and by the internal combustion engine and is not plugged in to charge.
 
Learn more about HEVs.
 
 
Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles
PHEVs are powered by an internal combustion engine that can run on conventional or alternative fuel and an electric motor that uses energy stored in a battery. The vehicle can be plugged in to an electric power source to charge the battery. Some can travel more than 70 miles on electricity alone, and all can operate solely on gasoline (similar to a conventional hybrid).
 
Learn more about PHEVs.
 
 
All-Electric Vehicles
EVs use a battery to store the electric energy that powers the motor. EV batteries are charged by plugging the vehicle into an electric power source.
 
Learn more about EVs.